The APP (Association of Professional Piercers) offers specific information geared towards medical procedures and things like MRIs and CAT scans, with detailed info as well as personal experiences. According to the information they offer, getting an MRI with your body jewelry in should not be an issue so long as the jewelry does not interfere with the area being investigated. You wouldn’t want anything getting in the way of such an intense and detailed imaging process, anyway! High quality metal jewelry is non-magnetic, and as MRIs are magnetic resonance imaging, they should not interfere it at all. Cheap jewelry however should not be worn, and can actually be dangerous in this situation. If you are questioning whether your jewelry can stand up to it, just take it out to be safe.

CAT scans are a different deal altogether, and if you have piercings with metal body jewelry in the area being scanned, they need to be taken out because the metal will cause the images to blur. In this case, opt for jewelry made of alternative materials, such as those found in piercing retainers.

Another example are mouth piercings. Should you be going to the dentist to have X-rays done, you really should not have them in because the metal will interfere with the imaging, and most likely will produce blurred results.

If you need to take your metal jewelry out for an exam, and do not want it to close, you do have several jewelry options. Piercing retainers are excellent temporary solutions that go in the place of regular body jewelry, and they are made of materials like bioplast, acrylic, and glass. These materials are body safe, and generally won’t cause irritation or infection, while retaining the hole. This can be really important because certain piercings can close within just hours of having the jewelry out.

When you have a piercing, it’s pretty normal to wonder if you can or cannot wear your body jewelry during a medical exam or procedure. There is no one accurate answer, as everyone, and every medical scenario is different. Generally, for surgical procedures all jewelry, pierced or otherwise, including wedding rings should be removed prior. It’s a safety measure that may not seem to make sense, but it’s always better to prepare ahead of time. Your doctor may or may not have specific guidelines you need to adhere to, and as always, if you are unsure about something make sure you address it! Asking questions is never a bad thing, especially when it comes to anything medical.

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