Posted by:
Joshua

Posted on: February 15, 2011
0 Comments

The most important thing to do when you are about to insert any type of body jewelry is to clean it.

It is very important to take proper care of you body piercing jewelry. Here are some helpful hints for proper body jewelry care and cleaning:

  • Do not soak Acrylic balls and jewelry with Gemstones in alcohol, as this can damage the acrylic by making it shatter and loosen any adhesive utilized on the piece.
  • The best way to clean your jewelry is wash it with warm soapy (antibacterial soap) water and ALWAYS avoid harsh detergents
  • You may also use a cotton ball dipped in a little bit of alcohol and gently wipe the barbell or the portion that will pass through your body piercing.
  • Always remove dangling body jewelry when sleeping, swimming, exercising, or when you are wearing clothing that might get caught on your piercing.
  • Threaded jewelry balls sometimes have a tendency to come loose with regular use, so make sure to check them regularly, so that you don’t loose them. If loose, gently tighten them. (replacement balls)
  • Make sure not to over tighten your body jewelry as this will strip the threads.
  • Tongue rings and body jewelry can be damaged or begin to loose their color by acidic foods, alcohol, cigarette smoke, coffee, mouthwash, chlorine, soaps, etc.
  • Vibrating, Morph-Light, Blinking/Flashing or other tongue piercing jewelrythat require batteries to function may get damaged with over use. Make sure to remove these when sleeping and to check the batteries regularly.
  • Always WASH your hands thoroughly prior to cleaning, or touching on or near your piercing for any reason.

These tips should help you keep your body jewelry in the best condition possible.

If you have any more questions regarding proper body jewelry care and cleaning we recommend contacting your local qualified body piercing professional. They are generally happy to help.

DISCLAIMER
These guidelines are based on a combination of vast professional experience, common sense, research, and extensive clinical practice. This is not to be considered a substitute for medical advice from a doctor. Be aware, however, that many doctors have no specific training or experience regarding piercing and may not be educated on how to best assist you.

Copyright © 2000, by the Association of Professional Piercers, any changes or deletions are strictly prohibited and must be approved in writing by the APP.

Be Sociable, Share!